Right light, right setting, great pictures


Shutterbugs 3 students turn focus to manual settings, locations and tripods

By Sherry Matthews - [email protected]



Shutterbugs 3 student Cindy Ivey took this photo she entitled ‘Hog House Reflections’ at houses on Ivey Farms in Duplin County. She liked the photo, she said, because of the vivid reflections on the lagoon showing the sky and the houses. The photograph was taken with manual settings - ISO 100 and 1/200 second.


The vibrant colors of this Iris are what caught Shutterbugs 3 student Emma Williams attention, drawing her eye — and her camera — to the flower. She called it her ‘Young Purple Beauty,’ and selected it as one of her final exam pictures , she said, because of the way the light reflected the vibrant beauty.


Shutterbugs 3 student Joan Tsao used one of her class assignment photos for her final exam, noting that she loved the way the reflections were caught in the bubble. ‘I was just thrilled that I was able to get a good shot of the bubble; the reflection I was able to catch was an added bonus.’


Denise McLamb found this duck, at the aviary owned by Don and Ann Butler, in a most unusual position and quickly pulled her camera out to catch the moment in time. The picture is aptly titled ‘Boy Do I Need A Manicure’ and, she said, captured the detail of the ducks feathers and various colors. ‘I also loved that I was able to blur the background, giving it a different look,’ she said.


Editor’s note: Today continues a series of feature front pages from Sampson Community College’s photography classes in Levels 3-4. More photos from Shutterbugs 3 will be published Sunday, June 19. Photography classes resume in the fall for Digital Do’s and Don’ts, Shutterbugs II and Shutterbugs III. To register, call SCC at 910-592-8081 and ask for the Continuing Education Department.

For students in Sampson Community College’s Shutterbugs III class, the third semester of photography has taken them from the classroom to the outside world, where they’ve turned their attention to fine-tuning their skills, learning more about manual focus and the all-important skill of setting up and using a tripod.

Along the way, those lessons have also taken them to some interesting places — Wilmington to photograph the Battleship North Carolina at sunset, the school’s campus to capture the structures under the guise of night, to an aviary to work with light as they chased pheasants and ducks and to the nation’s capitol to capture historic settings both in daylight and after nightfall.

“I could fill a book with what I’ve learned,” remarked Emma Williams, who said perhaps the most important lessons she has garnered from the third class is that “light makes a difference, a real difference.

“I’ve also found out that different positions and settings on the camera produce different results. And, of course, I have grown to really love taking pictures.”

The love of photography is the key component of all the lessons taught by SCC instructor Gloria Edwards who says she wants her students to learn a lot of things during her array of classes, but most important of all, she is quick to point out, is instilling a love for photography.

“I want them to enjoy taking pictures. That’s the main thing I hope they walk away with – a love of photography.” Coupled with that, Edwards noted, is a love of one’s surroundings, something made more keen as students develop a photographer’s eye, seeing the world around them in a far different light.

“I just love these classes,” said Lisa Turlington, director of the Sampson Community College Foundation and a third-year student in Edwards’ Shutterbugs 3. “I have become more aware of color and light, and I’ve learned to use my tripod as more than an accessory!”

Tackling tripods is one of the lessons taught in Shutterbugs 3, and all those in the class said once they got the hang of setting them up and using them, they love the added advantage they bring, especially when taking night photographs.

“There have been many things to learn in these classes,” stressed Cindy Ivey. “In addition to manual settings, the class has also taught me the importance of a tripod when using a slow shutter speed. But the classes are about so much more, too. The field trips have been wonderful and the bonding with fellow classmates who love photography has just been awesome. Gloria makes it fun and exciting. I can’t wait for the next class.”

Like Ivey, Judi Herring said there were many aspects of the class she loved. “But I think the most important thing for me was the building of my self-confidence to take a good picture. And I love that I’ve learned to look beyond the obvious to find good pictures. Thankfully, I’m not intimidated anyone to take pictures no matter where I am. Gloria has taught me that, among so many other things.”

Publisher/Editor Sherry Matthews can be reached at 910-249-4612. Follow her on Twitter @sieditor1960 and like The Sampson Independent on Facebook.

Shutterbugs 3 students turn focus to manual settings, locations and tripods

By Sherry Matthews

[email protected]

Shutterbugs 3 student Cindy Ivey took this photo she entitled ‘Hog House Reflections’ at houses on Ivey Farms in Duplin County. She liked the photo, she said, because of the vivid reflections on the lagoon showing the sky and the houses. The photograph was taken with manual settings – ISO 100 and 1/200 second.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_012A6089-Cindy-Ivey-1.jpgShutterbugs 3 student Cindy Ivey took this photo she entitled ‘Hog House Reflections’ at houses on Ivey Farms in Duplin County. She liked the photo, she said, because of the vivid reflections on the lagoon showing the sky and the houses. The photograph was taken with manual settings – ISO 100 and 1/200 second.

The vibrant colors of this Iris are what caught Shutterbugs 3 student Emma Williams attention, drawing her eye — and her camera — to the flower. She called it her ‘Young Purple Beauty,’ and selected it as one of her final exam pictures , she said, because of the way the light reflected the vibrant beauty.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_My-Beautiful-young-Iris-Emma-1.jpgThe vibrant colors of this Iris are what caught Shutterbugs 3 student Emma Williams attention, drawing her eye — and her camera — to the flower. She called it her ‘Young Purple Beauty,’ and selected it as one of her final exam pictures , she said, because of the way the light reflected the vibrant beauty.

Shutterbugs 3 student Joan Tsao used one of her class assignment photos for her final exam, noting that she loved the way the reflections were caught in the bubble. ‘I was just thrilled that I was able to get a good shot of the bubble; the reflection I was able to catch was an added bonus.’
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_4-Do-you-see-what-I-see-buble-reflection-Joan-Tsao-1.jpgShutterbugs 3 student Joan Tsao used one of her class assignment photos for her final exam, noting that she loved the way the reflections were caught in the bubble. ‘I was just thrilled that I was able to get a good shot of the bubble; the reflection I was able to catch was an added bonus.’

Denise McLamb found this duck, at the aviary owned by Don and Ann Butler, in a most unusual position and quickly pulled her camera out to catch the moment in time. The picture is aptly titled ‘Boy Do I Need A Manicure’ and, she said, captured the detail of the ducks feathers and various colors. ‘I also loved that I was able to blur the background, giving it a different look,’ she said.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_IMG_4969-Denise-McLamb-1.jpgDenise McLamb found this duck, at the aviary owned by Don and Ann Butler, in a most unusual position and quickly pulled her camera out to catch the moment in time. The picture is aptly titled ‘Boy Do I Need A Manicure’ and, she said, captured the detail of the ducks feathers and various colors. ‘I also loved that I was able to blur the background, giving it a different look,’ she said.

Publisher/Editor Sherry Matthews can be reached at 910-249-4612. Follow her on Twitter @sieditor1960 and like The Sampson Independent on Facebook.

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