Just the right angle


Digital Do’s and Don’t’s students use cameras to tell stories

Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Joan Tsao entitled her exam photo ‘Two Friends,’ noting that she liked this picture, shot with an iPhone propped on a log, because of the angles, the sunset and the message it relayed. ‘I was practicing taking sunets,’ Tsao said, ‘and I was able to capture this using continuous shooting.’ The photo was taken at Cedar Acres in Clinton.


Ronda Stroud’s photograph ‘Team Spirit,’ was one of her five selected Digital Do’s and Don’ts exam pictures. She chose it, she said, because of the expressions on each team member’s face. ‘That alone tells the story,’ she pointed out. Like her classmates, Stroud said the SCC class and instructor Gloria Edwards had taught her many things, including how to hone her skills.


Using automatic setting, Nicole Kennedy composed a photograph, entitled ‘Beach Baby,’ that shows a beach vacation at its best, complete with sand, shells and a pretty little girl. ‘You didn’t even have to see my baby’s face to know she was enjoying herself in the sand,’ Kennedy remarked.


Mary Powell happened upon this young girl on a Topsail Beach pier and took her photograph, showing off the shark she’d just caught. Powell, a Digital Do’s and Don’t’s student, said she loved the lines in the photograph, along with the expression on the little girl’s face. ‘I learned many things in the class,’ Powell stressed, ‘including that you don’t need a flash to get a good picture and that it’s important to stand still and move your camera.’


Amelia Surratt captured this photograph of a humming bird perched on a feeder with his tongue sticking out while in her back yard one day. Using sports setting, Surratt was able to blur the background while getting a crisp, clean shot of the bird in action. The Digital Do’s and Don’t’s class, she said, brought her much joy and taught her many things about her camera and how she can use it to capture the beauty around her.


Digital Do’s and Don’t’s students use cameras to tell stories

Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Joan Tsao entitled her exam photo ‘Two Friends,’ noting that she liked this picture, shot with an iPhone propped on a log, because of the angles, the sunset and the message it relayed. ‘I was practicing taking sunets,’ Tsao said, ‘and I was able to capture this using continuous shooting.’ The photo was taken at Cedar Acres in Clinton.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_2-Friends-Joan-Tsao.jpgDigital Do’s and Don’ts student Joan Tsao entitled her exam photo ‘Two Friends,’ noting that she liked this picture, shot with an iPhone propped on a log, because of the angles, the sunset and the message it relayed. ‘I was practicing taking sunets,’ Tsao said, ‘and I was able to capture this using continuous shooting.’ The photo was taken at Cedar Acres in Clinton.

Ronda Stroud’s photograph ‘Team Spirit,’ was one of her five selected Digital Do’s and Don’ts exam pictures. She chose it, she said, because of the expressions on each team member’s face. ‘That alone tells the story,’ she pointed out. Like her classmates, Stroud said the SCC class and instructor Gloria Edwards had taught her many things, including how to hone her skills.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_IMG_0825-R.jpgRonda Stroud’s photograph ‘Team Spirit,’ was one of her five selected Digital Do’s and Don’ts exam pictures. She chose it, she said, because of the expressions on each team member’s face. ‘That alone tells the story,’ she pointed out. Like her classmates, Stroud said the SCC class and instructor Gloria Edwards had taught her many things, including how to hone her skills.

Using automatic setting, Nicole Kennedy composed a photograph, entitled ‘Beach Baby,’ that shows a beach vacation at its best, complete with sand, shells and a pretty little girl. ‘You didn’t even have to see my baby’s face to know she was enjoying herself in the sand,’ Kennedy remarked.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_IMG_8277-NicoleKennedy.jpgUsing automatic setting, Nicole Kennedy composed a photograph, entitled ‘Beach Baby,’ that shows a beach vacation at its best, complete with sand, shells and a pretty little girl. ‘You didn’t even have to see my baby’s face to know she was enjoying herself in the sand,’ Kennedy remarked.

Mary Powell happened upon this young girl on a Topsail Beach pier and took her photograph, showing off the shark she’d just caught. Powell, a Digital Do’s and Don’t’s student, said she loved the lines in the photograph, along with the expression on the little girl’s face. ‘I learned many things in the class,’ Powell stressed, ‘including that you don’t need a flash to get a good picture and that it’s important to stand still and move your camera.’
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_IMG_4686-M.jpgMary Powell happened upon this young girl on a Topsail Beach pier and took her photograph, showing off the shark she’d just caught. Powell, a Digital Do’s and Don’t’s student, said she loved the lines in the photograph, along with the expression on the little girl’s face. ‘I learned many things in the class,’ Powell stressed, ‘including that you don’t need a flash to get a good picture and that it’s important to stand still and move your camera.’

Amelia Surratt captured this photograph of a humming bird perched on a feeder with his tongue sticking out while in her back yard one day. Using sports setting, Surratt was able to blur the background while getting a crisp, clean shot of the bird in action. The Digital Do’s and Don’t’s class, she said, brought her much joy and taught her many things about her camera and how she can use it to capture the beauty around her.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_IMG_4174-amelia.jpgAmelia Surratt captured this photograph of a humming bird perched on a feeder with his tongue sticking out while in her back yard one day. Using sports setting, Surratt was able to blur the background while getting a crisp, clean shot of the bird in action. The Digital Do’s and Don’t’s class, she said, brought her much joy and taught her many things about her camera and how she can use it to capture the beauty around her.

Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Joan Tsao entitled her exam photo ‘Two Friends,’ noting that she liked this picture, shot with an iPhone propped on a log, because of the angles, the sunset and the message it relayed. ‘I was practicing taking sunets,’ Tsao said, ‘and I was able to capture this using continuous shooting.’ The photo was taken at Cedar Acres in Clinton.

Ronda Stroud’s photograph ‘Team Spirit,’ was one of her five selected Digital Do’s and Don’ts exam pictures. She chose it, she said, because of the expressions on each team member’s face. ‘That alone tells the story,’ she pointed out. Like her classmates, Stroud said the SCC class and instructor Gloria Edwards had taught her many things, including how to hone her skills.

Using automatic setting, Nicole Kennedy composed a photograph, entitled ‘Beach Baby,’ that shows a beach vacation at its best, complete with sand, shells and a pretty little girl. ‘You didn’t even have to see my baby’s face to know she was enjoying herself in the sand,’ Kennedy remarked.

Mary Powell happened upon this young girl on a Topsail Beach pier and took her photograph, showing off the shark she’d just caught. Powell, a Digital Do’s and Don’t’s student, said she loved the lines in the photograph, along with the expression on the little girl’s face. ‘I learned many things in the class,’ Powell stressed, ‘including that you don’t need a flash to get a good picture and that it’s important to stand still and move your camera.’

Amelia Surratt captured this photograph of a humming bird perched on a feeder with his tongue sticking out while in her back yard one day. Using sports setting, Surratt was able to blur the background while getting a crisp, clean shot of the bird in action. The Digital Do’s and Don’t’s class, she said, brought her much joy and taught her many things about her camera and how she can use it to capture the beauty around her.

comments powered by Disqus