Hobbton student honored by law organization


By Chase Jordan - [email protected]



Meyer


Who was Miranda?

In the 1960s, Ernesto Miranda was identified in a police lineup by a woman, who accused him of kidnapping and rape. He was arrested and questioned by authorities for two hours until h confessed to the crimes. During the time, police did not tell Miranda about his Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination or his Sixth Amendment right to an attorney. The case went to trial in an Arizona state court and the prosecutor used the confession as evidence against Miranda, who was convicted and sentenced to 20 to 30 years in prison. His attorney appealed to the Arizona Supreme Court, which upheld the conviction. Later, an appeal was sent to the United States Supreme Court, which agreed to hear it along with four similar cases. In taking the case, the Court had to determine the role police have in protecting the rights of the accused guaranteed by the Fifth and Sixth Amendments.

A decision resulted in the Supreme Court ruling 5-4 in favor of Miranda. This decision gave rise to what has become known as the Miranda Warning: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do can and will be held against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you. Do you understand these rights as they have been read to you?”

Source — www.uscourts.gov

Ty Meyer, a student a Hobbton High School, was honored for his beliefs when it comes to the law and Miranda rights.

He received third place in the Law Day essay contest though the North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA), which featured entries from all over North Carolina.

“I was really excited,” Meyer said about his work titled “Liberty and Justice for All. It was a big surprise for me. I thought it would be something really interesting just to try out.”

The theme for 2016 was Miranda: More than Words.

“Without those words, we wouldn’t have liberty and justice to protect all people in America in a court of law,” Meyer said. “Every person has an equal opportunity to be heard.”

This year is the 50th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court Case, Miranda V. Arizona. The Miranda rights, is a right to silence given by police in the United States to suspects in custody or interrogation situations.

“It was about how important the Miranda rights were and how they impact our laws today and the significance of the Miranda rights,” Meyer said about his essay.

Along with other competitors across the state, he was recognized in Raleigh for his efforts. Students received awards for essay writing, poster art and moot court by North Carolina Supreme Court and Court of Appeals justices and judges. The Young Lawyers Division of NCBA hosted an awards luncheon at the City Club, where NCBA President Shelby Benton presented a proclamation by Gov. Pat McCrory.

Law Day was sparked by Charles S. Rhyne, president of the American Bar Association in the 1950s. With respect to the Cold War and Soviet Union’s commemoration of May Day, Rhyne drafted and personally delivered it to President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who proclaimed May 1, 1958, as the first observance.

“I think it’s important for students to understand how law works so they can be educated citizens,” he said.

Meyer, a sophomore, is currently taking civics and economic courses at Hobbton High School. He was encouraged by his teacher Carly Fogleman to get involved with the contest.

“I thank the Bar Association and my teacher, Ms. Fogleman, my parents and everyone else who helped me,” he said.

The student from Faison is the son of Tracey and Sandra Meyer, a district attorney. Before the contest, Meyer received a little taste for law.

“I’ve spent a lot of time with her around courtrooms and around the courthouse, so I’ve been really involved with law stuff,” Meyer said.

Outside of the classroom, he’s a member of the cross country, baseball, and golf teams. He’s also participates with Hobbton’s Future Farmers of America, Future Business Leaders of America, Student Government Association, Beta Club and Science Club.

Who was Miranda?

In the 1960s, Ernesto Miranda was identified in a police lineup by a woman, who accused him of kidnapping and rape. He was arrested and questioned by authorities for two hours until h confessed to the crimes. During the time, police did not tell Miranda about his Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination or his Sixth Amendment right to an attorney. The case went to trial in an Arizona state court and the prosecutor used the confession as evidence against Miranda, who was convicted and sentenced to 20 to 30 years in prison. His attorney appealed to the Arizona Supreme Court, which upheld the conviction. Later, an appeal was sent to the United States Supreme Court, which agreed to hear it along with four similar cases. In taking the case, the Court had to determine the role police have in protecting the rights of the accused guaranteed by the Fifth and Sixth Amendments.

A decision resulted in the Supreme Court ruling 5-4 in favor of Miranda. This decision gave rise to what has become known as the Miranda Warning: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do can and will be held against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you. Do you understand these rights as they have been read to you?”

Source — www.uscourts.gov

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

By Chase Jordan

[email protected]

Meyer
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Meyer-1.jpgMeyer

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

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