Clinton High School students receive lessons from culinary specialist


Culinary specialist present, cook for CHS students

By Chase Jordan - [email protected]



Malik Faison, right, a senior at Clinton High School, prepares a snack with Missie Reed, a culinary specialist.


A thousand dollars for an ice cream sundae?

During a food class at Clinton High School, the price tag of the dessert from Serendipity 3 in New York raised a lot of eyebrows. But after an explanation from Missie Reed, a culinary specialist from The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, the students understood why. For a lot of rich people, spending one grand is like spending $10.

“It has edible gold and it has the finest Tahitian vanilla bean ice cream made with Madagascar vanilla,” Reed said while describing just one part of the fancy treat.

It was just one of many lessons about the opportunities in the world of art. During the visit, Reed also mentioned various programs offered through The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham. Some of them included game design, graphics and filmmaking.

“It’s a great opportunity for them to see creative careers and real world examples,” Reed stressed.”There’s a lot of creative things she can do.”

Tracy Hatcher, an educator at Clinton High School, said her visit allowed students to learn about opportunities in the food industry and other related fields.

CHS also runs a Family Career Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) and a Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) programs. Along with educators Donna Owens and Twanda Moore, some of the related topics taught to students at CHS include food, nutrition and parenting.

“We try to bring in guest speakers to give these students an opportunity to see what life is like beyond the four walls,” Hatcher said. “With a hands-on experience, they can see it right before their eyes.”

Sophomores Ericka Herring and Justin Brown were among several students who enjoyed the visit and the hands-on aspect, which is different from just sitting in the classroom.

“It’s stuff that you need to know to better yourself,” Brown said. “When you get a house or apartment, you want to know how to cook.”

Next year, Herring would like to spend a week in a summer program at the Arts Institute to learn more about cooking.

Following the presentation, the students made corn cakes with real corn kernels, cheddar cheese and topped with honey or hot sauce. While the food was made, the students learned some interesting facts such as the hamburger originating in Germany and how the average pork consumer will consume 28 pigs in a lifetime.

Food is Reed’s passion, and growing up, she was always around people cooking.

“I love culinary arts, but it also gives me the opportunity to introduce students to higher education,” Reed said. “Going to college is very important. It’s critical, especially for our future generation.”

Like Hatcher and other educators, Reed wants other students to realize the choices they have beyond high school.

“I always tell them not to look at your circumstances right now, you never know where life will take you,” Reed said. “They could be the ones eating the $1,000 sundae or you can be the executive or come up with your own creative concept.”

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

Culinary specialist present, cook for CHS students

By Chase Jordan

[email protected]

Malik Faison, right, a senior at Clinton High School, prepares a snack with Missie Reed, a culinary specialist.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_Chef_1.jpgMalik Faison, right, a senior at Clinton High School, prepares a snack with Missie Reed, a culinary specialist.

http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_Chef_2.jpg

http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_Chef_3.jpg

http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_Chef_4.jpg

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

comments powered by Disqus