Variety of children’s services provided


By Gail Lamb, RN, MSN - Health Department



Sampson County’s total population is 63,746 and of that number, 16,130 are children aged 18 and below. That means children make up about 25 percent of Sampson County’s total population. That number may have little significance for some, but it is of great value. This population is a group that is solely dependent upon others to ensure their health, well-being and needs are met. Whether it is parents, guardians, family members or members of the community, we all play a vital role in caring for our youth.

The Sampson County Health Department works tirelessly to be an active participant in caring for the county’s youth by implementing best practice recommended services to meet the needs of our youth. These services are Well Child Check through our Child Health Clinic and Care Coordination for Children (CC4C) care management.

The Child Health Clinic Well Child Check involves performing assessments on children 0-21 years old as recommended by Medicaid. Through this program, the Sampson County Health Department is skilled to assist children to comply with the Department North Carolina’s requirements for entry into the kindergarten.

A child must have had a recent exam that includes physical, hearing, vision and developmental assessments and be up to date on immunizations. Sampson County and Clinton City Schools require specific paperwork to be completed to show that these requirements have been met. If exams and immunizations are not updated by the 30th day of enrollment, the child is usually required to stay at home until the requirements are met.

Well Child Checks provided through the Health Department also meet the requirements for children entering into Daycare, Preschool, HeadStart and More at Four. This assists with achieving our community goal of ensuring the health and well-being of children of Sampson County.

Bright Futures, a best practice program, is used by the Sampson County Health Department. The Bright Futures principles acknowledge the value of each child, the importance of family, the connection to community, and that children and youth with special health care needs are children first. These principles are used with each Well Child Check visit to assist in delivering and supporting the highest quality health care for children and their families.

The Care Coordination for Children – CC4C – Program is comprised of nurses and social workers that work as case managers under the direction of Medicaid’s Care Coordination for Children – CC4C – Program. The program provides assistance to children who are residents of Sampson County. The goal of CC4C is to improve the care of children in the county by linking families to services that will meet their specific needs and by arming families with education and resources available and safeguarding that those needs are met with timely follow-up and evaluation.

The CC4C is a program offered at no charge for children birth to 5 years of age who: have long term medical conditions; are dealing with challenges with their environment that may increase their stress levels; and/or referred by a medical provider or other community agencies.

Once a referral is received, a CC4C care manager is assigned to the family to assess the needs of child and family. A plan of care and goals are developed by the family with the assistance of CC4C staff. CC4C care managers work with families through home visits, phone calls, provider visits, and other types of contact to assist them with meeting their needs. One of the major goals of the CC4C Program is to build strong family relationships.

For Child Health Clinic Well Child Checks, you can call to schedule an appointment at the Sampson County Health Department at 910-592-1131, extension 4001, 4960 or 4220.

For more information on the Care Coordination for Children – CC4C – Program or to make a referral, you can call 910-592-1131, ext. 4969, 4230, 4973 or 4237. Referrals may also be faxed to 910-592-4724, ATTN: Gail Lamb.

By Gail Lamb, RN, MSN

Health Department

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