SCS making strides towards improvements


By Chase Jordan - [email protected]



Lisa Reynolds, director of federal programs, makes a presentation to the Sampson County Board of Education about Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives. It was one of several updates presented to the board.


Officials of Sampson County are continuing to make improvements in the classroom by setting goals in several subject areas during the 2015-16 school years for middle and high schools.

During a recent meeting for the district’s Board of Education, those goals were presented by Col. Tommy Macon, Assistant Superintendent, and Becky Lockamy, director of middle schools education.

The district’s middle schools set several priorities. Some of them include math, discipline, increasing achievements for subgroups and increasing reading proficiency. To help in the math field, educators are using the Math Design Collaborative program, sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Southern Regional Education Board.

“When I saw this, I felt that this program had merit,” Lockamy said.

She continued and said that students love the program and said it uses a hands-on approach.

“I have seen some rejuvenation in our teachers and some excitement in math,” she said.

Another tool Lockamy mentioned was Think Through Math, a computer program which supports students and teachers with personalized, interactive instruction. The 24/7 program allows the students to receive live support.

“They can be at home at 8 o’clock at night and have trouble with math problems and they can login and talk with someone to help step by step,” Lockamy said about all of the middle schools having access to the program.

For local high schools, some of priorities included closing the gap between subgroups at Hobbton High School, increasing math proficiency and improving test scores.

“I’m very pleased with what all five high schools have in place for this school year,” Macon said.

While discussing Lakewood High School goal to improve increase math proficiency from 48 percent to 58 percent, Macon said a “golden nugget may have been discovered in the math arena through an extension program.

At Midway High School one of their goals is to improve End-of-Course (EOC) performance scores in English, math and biology. During his presentation, he mentioned time set aside to improve instruction in math. Union High School wants to raise the overall proficiency score from 37 percent to 42 percent. One area, where the school is falling short is biology. As a solution, Macon said a plan is in place to offer biology during their junior year, instead of their sophomore year.

“This will give students a little more time to mature as well as get another science class before going to biology,” Macon said.

The goal at Sampson Early College High School is to make sure 95 percent of students will achieve their predicted mark or higher on all EOCs and North Carolina Final Exams based on an assessment system. Another goal is to have 95 percent of junior meet their projected range score or higher on the ACT.

In addition to the reports Jeana Carr, director of elementary education, presented on elementary schools and Lisa Reynolds, director of federal programs, discussed the Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives, a series of federal performance targets which includes many subgroups.

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

By Chase Jordan

[email protected]

Lisa Reynolds, director of federal programs, makes a presentation to the Sampson County Board of Education about Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives. It was one of several updates presented to the board.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_SCS.jpgLisa Reynolds, director of federal programs, makes a presentation to the Sampson County Board of Education about Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives. It was one of several updates presented to the board.

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

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