Marching to the polls


The Sampson County branch of the NAACP sponsored ‘Moral March to the Polls’ on Saturday, in honor of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala., more than 50 years ago. The march on Saturday, which was followed by ‘Souls to the Polls’ on Sunday, represented local participation in the statewide ‘Our Time, Our Vote’ Get Out The Vote campaign focused on voter engagement, education, mobilization and voter protection, while also marking the anniversary of ‘Bloody Sunday.’ The pivotal confrontation on the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma paved the way for the passing of the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965. Over 50 years later, it is still necessary for Americans to fight for their right to vote, Sampson NAACP president Lee Byam said. The Moral March to the Polls invited all people to participate in that democratic process. Early voting for the March 15 primary will extend through this Saturday at the Board of Elections, located at 120 County Complex Road, Building F, Clinton.


The Sampson County branch of the NAACP sponsored ‘Moral March to the Polls’ on Saturday, in honor of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala., more than 50 years ago. The march on Saturday, which was followed by ‘Souls to the Polls’ on Sunday, represented local participation in the statewide ‘Our Time, Our Vote’ Get Out The Vote campaign focused on voter engagement, education, mobilization and voter protection, while also marking the anniversary of ‘Bloody Sunday.’ The pivotal confrontation on the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma paved the way for the passing of the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965. Over 50 years later, it is still necessary for Americans to fight for their right to vote, Sampson NAACP president Lee Byam said. The Moral March to the Polls invited all people to participate in that democratic process. Early voting for the March 15 primary will extend through this Saturday at the Board of Elections, located at 120 County Complex Road, Building F, Clinton.

The Sampson County branch of the NAACP sponsored ‘Moral March to the Polls’ on Saturday, in honor of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala., more than 50 years ago. The march on Saturday, which was followed by ‘Souls to the Polls’ on Sunday, represented local participation in the statewide ‘Our Time, Our Vote’ Get Out The Vote campaign focused on voter engagement, education, mobilization and voter protection, while also marking the anniversary of ‘Bloody Sunday.’ The pivotal confrontation on the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma paved the way for the passing of the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965. Over 50 years later, it is still necessary for Americans to fight for their right to vote, Sampson NAACP president Lee Byam said. The Moral March to the Polls invited all people to participate in that democratic process. Early voting for the March 15 primary will extend through this Saturday at the Board of Elections, located at 120 County Complex Road, Building F, Clinton.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_NAACP-march.jpgThe Sampson County branch of the NAACP sponsored ‘Moral March to the Polls’ on Saturday, in honor of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala., more than 50 years ago. The march on Saturday, which was followed by ‘Souls to the Polls’ on Sunday, represented local participation in the statewide ‘Our Time, Our Vote’ Get Out The Vote campaign focused on voter engagement, education, mobilization and voter protection, while also marking the anniversary of ‘Bloody Sunday.’ The pivotal confrontation on the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma paved the way for the passing of the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965. Over 50 years later, it is still necessary for Americans to fight for their right to vote, Sampson NAACP president Lee Byam said. The Moral March to the Polls invited all people to participate in that democratic process. Early voting for the March 15 primary will extend through this Saturday at the Board of Elections, located at 120 County Complex Road, Building F, Clinton.
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