S’burg corn expected to ‘bounce back’ from hail damage


By Sherry Matthews - [email protected]



Heavy rains and pellet-sized hail found its way to parts of Sampson County Thursday, with hail pummeling corn crops in the Salemburg area. Cooperative Extension agents say the hail reportedly bruised the leaves but didn’t damage the growth point.


Pellet-sized hail, shown here, pummeled the Salemburg area last Thursday, causing some damage in its wake.


SALEMBURG — Although the rain that saturated Sampson’s soil last Thursday was greatly needed, especially by farmers, the hail that came along with it, at least in some portions of the county, wasn’t nearly as welcomed.

Della King, field crop agent for Sampson’s Cooperative Extension Service, confirmed Monday that there had been some reports of hail damage with Thursday’s storms in the Salemburg area. Although she said she had not seen the damage herself, farmers in the area noted that the hail had stripped some of the leaves, a better scenario than it could have been.

“I understand that it stripped the leaves. Most of the time, corn can bounce back from that,” King noted. “If it had damaged the growing point, though, that’s where farmers would run into some trouble spots, some real issues.”

Thursday’s hail, she said, appeared not to have damage that growing point. “It looks like this was minor damage, especially since I’m told it only damaged the leaves. They, and I agree, feel like the corn can come out of it.”

Farmers began planting corn at the end of March with harvest usually coming towards the middle of July. That, of course, depends on the variety and the maturity of the variety, King pointed out.

With the crop in the ground less than two full months, hail still has the potential to wreak havoc. “That’s for sure. Hail can cause a great deal of damage. Fortunately, this time around, it doesn’t look like it did.”

And, of course, the other part of the storm — the rains — were a welcome sight across Sampson County.

“We’ve been really dry,” King attested, “but the rains we’ve had over the last couple of weeks has made a difference. We could use some more, but we are doing far better than we were, that’s for sure.”

Approximately 3 inches of rain fell in most areas of Sampson Thursday, saturating the ground and giving crops the nurture King said they needed.

“Every drop is appreciated,” she added.

Publisher and editor Sherry Matthews can be reached at 910-249-4612. Follow her on Twitter @sieditor1960; follow the paper @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

By Sherry Matthews

[email protected]

Heavy rains and pellet-sized hail found its way to parts of Sampson County Thursday, with hail pummeling corn crops in the Salemburg area. Cooperative Extension agents say the hail reportedly bruised the leaves but didn’t damage the growth point.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Hail-Corn.jpgHeavy rains and pellet-sized hail found its way to parts of Sampson County Thursday, with hail pummeling corn crops in the Salemburg area. Cooperative Extension agents say the hail reportedly bruised the leaves but didn’t damage the growth point.

Pellet-sized hail, shown here, pummeled the Salemburg area last Thursday, causing some damage in its wake.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Hail.jpgPellet-sized hail, shown here, pummeled the Salemburg area last Thursday, causing some damage in its wake.

Publisher and editor Sherry Matthews can be reached at 910-249-4612. Follow her on Twitter @sieditor1960; follow the paper @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

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