A sage planting


In northern Duplin County, one can find a pretty white and purple field with what most would think is an unusual but beautiful crop. Its name is just about as unusual as the crop itself and not that easily recognized by most farmers in this area. It’s called clary sage. Mostly grown in the northeast part of North Carolina, clary sage, or the small amounts of chemical (sclareol) it produces at harvest time, can be found in the lasting aroma of dryer sheets, hand lotions and fabric softeners. Sclareolide is vital to making those scents last. And according to a recent article in Our State Magazine, an entire acre of the sage “typically yields only about 50 pounds of the chemical.


In northern Duplin County, one can find a pretty white and purple field with what most would think is an unusual but beautiful crop. Its name is just about as unusual as the crop itself and not that easily recognized by most farmers in this area. It’s called clary sage. Mostly grown in the northeast part of North Carolina, clary sage, or the small amounts of chemical (sclareol) it produces at harvest time, can be found in the lasting aroma of dryer sheets, hand lotions and fabric softeners. Sclareolide is vital to making those scents last. And according to a recent article in Our State Magazine, an entire acre of the sage “typically yields only about 50 pounds of the chemical.

In northern Duplin County, one can find a pretty white and purple field with what most would think is an unusual but beautiful crop. Its name is just about as unusual as the crop itself and not that easily recognized by most farmers in this area. It’s called clary sage. Mostly grown in the northeast part of North Carolina, clary sage, or the small amounts of chemical (sclareol) it produces at harvest time, can be found in the lasting aroma of dryer sheets, hand lotions and fabric softeners. Sclareolide is vital to making those scents last. And according to a recent article in Our State Magazine, an entire acre of the sage “typically yields only about 50 pounds of the chemical.
http://clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Sage2-1.jpgIn northern Duplin County, one can find a pretty white and purple field with what most would think is an unusual but beautiful crop. Its name is just about as unusual as the crop itself and not that easily recognized by most farmers in this area. It’s called clary sage. Mostly grown in the northeast part of North Carolina, clary sage, or the small amounts of chemical (sclareol) it produces at harvest time, can be found in the lasting aroma of dryer sheets, hand lotions and fabric softeners. Sclareolide is vital to making those scents last. And according to a recent article in Our State Magazine, an entire acre of the sage “typically yields only about 50 pounds of the chemical.
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